Monday, 26 April 2021

The Great Convergence

A convergence is the coming together of two or more people or ideas. When you look at the past fifty years you can see this convergence happening everywhere. The Uniparty is an example of that convergence. The way unions and business agree on issues. The way the media and the universities seem to be in lockstep with each other. How nothing today is controversial unless they agree that it is controversial. 

One of the reasons I am writing this is because of this article, Monopoly - an overview of the great reset - follow the money. It points out so much of the economic convergence. That nine media companies control most of the worlds media. That Pepsi and Coke both own large amounts of shares in each other, which means that they win no matter what drink you buy. Of course they also have investments in other companies, so producing and selling something is only part of how they make money. In fact it is possible, at least theoretically, for them to produce nothing and to still make money. 

We have also seen the convergence of political ideas. The 1980's was when it started to come into view, in fact I first heard the term the uniparty back in the late 1980's. In Australia it didn't matter who you voted for you got exactly the same thing. Of course that exact same phenomena was occurring everywhere in the West. 

But I think the real sign of how things have changed is in the unions and how the attitudes of both government and business changed. Strikes are quite rare today, not quite extinct, in the 1980's and before strikes were everyday events. Every single day someone would be on strike and industrial relations were major and constant news stories. But between roughly 1985-2000 the unions were brought under control. Trade was liberalized, strikes were made harder, immigration and feminism ate away at the traditional relationship between workers and the union and university education produced a new type of union leader. The new leaders had more in common with the people they had gone to university with then with the workers they represented. 

Government, business, unions, education and lots more besides have all received the same education, from kindergarden to post graduate education. A system that trains people and encourages them to think and act alike. That continues in the workplace, everywhere the same intrusive laws apply. Those who rise up make sure that they support the system, the convergence.

Each part of the convergence covers and protects other parts of the convergence. The media uses academics to support their position. Academics use the government to support them and on and on it goes. So attacking one point is useless, in fact it can often encourage convergence because they can see that they need to strengthen their position. Over time even those areas that seemed outside of the system, the churches, charities, private business have been converged. Money is the first point of call, it uses it's corrupting influence to break down barriers. I'm not talking about bribery, sometimes it is that crude, but mostly it is about encouraging the right behaviour.

Churches don't want to lose their tax free status so they bend. Charities see government dangling big money in front of them to deal with a problem that they want to be involved in. Business at every level wants to make money and often they will do whatever it takes to be allowed to do that. Then they come to regard that as an integral part of their business. The often complex relationship between government and business entangles both in a web.

International organisations and agreements also push this convergence. Everyone should be able to buy a Big Mac anywhere they want and have it taste the same. What is called Trade Equalisation, which means the removal of trade restrictions. The levelling of everything until you can move people, money and goods from anywhere to anywhere.

Of course the world of entertainment also does it's job, in many ways it kept that idea alive when it had mostly died in the early Twentieth Century. Entertainment is a universal language, it breaks down barriers and encourages cooperation between peoples and countries. And of course it spreads the idea's that they want spread. Entertainment is propaganda and it has been for a long time. To give just one example, since 1970 adultery in movies is never condemned. 

As the old saying goes ' The rich get richer and the poor get poorer', Billionaires get richer and today that also includes large corporations and charities. 

Investment funds, superannuation funds all fuel this. The secret is that they are not using their own money. Every woke organisation is doing it with someone else's money. As the economy becomes owned by fewer and fewer the wokeness will increase.

What this all means is that things are going to get worse because there is no easy way to reform the system that we live under. No reform can force through a big enough shift to make things better. It also means that when we attack one part of it then the other parts will defend it. I am not saying that everything is hopeless, but we must face the fact that we of what faces us.   

This will end if the system fails, which the massive debt is leading to. But it will only fail if there is an alternative that is ready to take it's place.


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1 comment:

  1. Money is the first point of call, it uses it's corrupting influence to break down barriers. I'm not talking about bribery, sometimes it is that crude, but mostly it is about encouraging the right behaviour.

    Yes. Western countries like to preen themselves on being less corrupt than Third World countries but in reality they're more corrupt. The problem in the West is massive legal corruption.

    When retired politicians are given company directorships or "jobs" as consultants, when retired generals land "jobs" with defence contractors, when former Cabinet ministers or presidents receive huge speaking fees from industry groups, when ex-politicians are given cushy positions with NGOs - these things are quite legal but they're all examples of corruption.

    Churches don't want to lose their tax free status so they bend. Charities see government dangling big money in front of them to deal with a problem that they want to be involved in.

    Yep, that's all corruption as well. And in many cases charities have money dangled in front of them to persuade them not to deal with issues that would upset powerful interest groups, which is why environmentalist groups don't take a stand against immigration. And of course many charities are not actually charities at all - they're political pressure groups being allowed to masquerade as charities.

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